pepper

Pepper Editor

A simple and opinionated modal code editor for your terminal

View the Project on GitHub

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A simple and opinionated modal code editor for your terminal

main screenshot

more screenshots

Pepper is an experiment of mine to simplify code editing from the terminal. It’s mission is to be a minimal and fast code editor with an orthogonal set of both editing and navigation features.

help page

default keybindings

command reference

defining language syntaxes

config recipes

changelog

try it on your browser!

installation

binaries

Pepper is open-source, which means you’re free to build it and access all of its features. However, to support the development, prebuilt binaries are available for purchase at itch.

vamolessa.itch.io/pepper

This will not only keep you updated with the latest features/fixes but also support further pepper development!

using cargo

Simply running cargo install pepper will get you the vanilla pepper editor experience.

However, if you also want LSP support, you can run cargo install pepper-plugin-lsp which will install the pepper editor together with its lsp plugin.

from source

cargo install --git https://github.com/vamolessa/pepper

NOTE(1): installing from source still requires cargo (at least it’s easier this way).

NOTE(2): installing from source will actually install the editor with the configurations I use (you can check my setup).

if you find a bug or need help

Please open an issue

goals

non goals

features

philosophy

In the spirit of Handmade, all features are coded from scratch using simple stable Rust code. These are the only external crates being used in the project:

modal editing

Pepper is modal which means keypresses do different things depending on which mode you’re in. However, it’s also designed to have few modes so the overhead is minimal. Most of the time, users will be in either normal or insert mode.

comparing to vim

Like Vim, you have to actively start text selection. However, unlike it, you can also manipulate selections in normal mode. Also, there’s no ‘action’ then ‘movement’. There’s only selections and actions. That is, d will always only delete selected text. If the selection was empty, it does nothing.

Pepper expands on Vim’s editing capabilities by supporting multiple cursors. This enables you to make several text transformations at once. Also, cursors behave like carets instead of blocks and can always go one-past-last-character-in-line.

In config recipes you’ll find some basic “vim-like” keybindigns for more vim comparisons.

comparing to kakoune

Like Kakoune, you can manipulate selections while in normal mode and actions always operate on selections. However, unlike it, normal mode remembers if you’re selecting text or nor (think a pseudo-mode). This way, there’s no need for extra alt- based keybindings.

Pepper is heavily inspired by Kakoune’s selection based workflow and multiple cursors. However its cursors behave like caret ranges instead of block selections. That is, the cursor is not a one-char selection but only a visual cue to indicate the caret location.

development thread

It’s possible to kinda follow Pepper’s development history in this twitter thread

support pepper development

Pepper is open-source, which means you’re free to build it and access all of its features.

However, prebuilt binaries are available for purchase at itch.

You can also directly buy me a coffee :)

Donate using Liberapay ko-fi

Please consider supporting Pepper’s development and I’ll be forever grateful :)